who else loves this

CME bitcoin futures

Data from the US CFTC reveals that institutions on the CME went 100 percent long on Bitcoin futures, potentially capitalizing on yet another impressive green candle in mid-May. 


CME: Institutions Went 100% Long on Bitcoin

According to information released by the US Commodity and Futures Trading Commission, institutional investors had opened 100 percent long Bitcoin futures contracts as of May 14th.

The total number of CME Bitcoin futures contract between May 7 and 14 was 199 and all of them were betting on Bitcoin going up. However, it’s also worth noting that the total number of opened positions was with 87 less compared to the week before that.

As Bitcoinist reported, smart money also went long on Bitcoin before April’s spectacular rally.  It appears that once again smart money rode the uptrend, as bitcoin price 00 soared with around 15 percent from May 13th to May 14th.

On the other hand, the information from the CFTC also reveals that the opened leveraged funds short positions are more than the long ones.

Short positions currently account for 55.2 percent of all leveraged positions on the platform with a total number of 2455 (1 position = 5 BTC). While long positions are less than that, their number has increased since the previous week, while short positions have decreased.

Looking at Retail

While institutions have gone entirely long as of May 14th, since then retail seems to be a bit more bearish.

Data from TradingView shows that the number of short positions on cryptocurrency exchange Bitfinex has increased by about 12 percent in the last five days.

The number of long positions on the exchange is also marking an increase but it’s less impressive compared to the surge in shorts. Long positions have increased by around 4 percent in the last five days.

Bitcoinist reported earlier today that the more Bitcoin price remained stuck at the resistance range at around $8,000, the more likely it was to correct. And while the cryptocurrency did, in fact, plunge 6.7 percent, some traders like Josh Rager remain unfazed:

$BTC still in this condensing formation and held by horizontal supports. Not a lot has changed which shows that you don’t have to stare at charts all day – waiting for that next massive candle.

Bitcoin price analysis meanwhile shows that BTC/USD is currently being supported by an ascending triangle pattern, a bullish sign.

Where do you think will Bitcoin go from here? Don’t hesitate to let us know in the comments below!


Images courtesy of TradingView, CFTC, Shutterstock.

The post Bitcoin Futures: Institutions Went 100% Long as Price Soared to $8K appeared first on Bitcoinist.com.

CME bitcoin futures

Data from the US CFTC reveals that institutions on the CME went 100 percent long on Bitcoin futures, potentially capitalizing on yet another impressive green candle in mid-May. 


CME: Institutions Went 100% Long on Bitcoin

According to information released by the US Commodity and Futures Trading Commission, institutional investors had opened 100 percent long Bitcoin futures contracts as of May 14th.

The total number of CME Bitcoin futures contract between May 7 and 14 was 199 and all of them were betting on Bitcoin going up. However, it's also worth noting that the total number of opened positions was with 87 less compared to the week before that.

As Bitcoinist reported, smart money also went long on Bitcoin before April's spectacular rally.  It appears that once again smart money rode the uptrend, as bitcoin price 00 soared with around 15 percent from May 13th to May 14th.

On the other hand, the information from the CFTC also reveals that the opened leveraged funds short positions are more than the long ones.

Short positions currently account for 55.2 percent of all leveraged positions on the platform with a total number of 2455 (1 position = 5 BTC). While long positions are less than that, their number has increased since the previous week, while short positions have decreased.

Looking at Retail

While institutions have gone entirely long as of May 14th, since then retail seems to be a bit more bearish.

Data from TradingView shows that the number of short positions on cryptocurrency exchange Bitfinex has increased by about 12 percent in the last five days.

The number of long positions on the exchange is also marking an increase but it's less impressive compared to the surge in shorts. Long positions have increased by around 4 percent in the last five days.

Bitcoinist reported earlier today that the more Bitcoin price remained stuck at the resistance range at around $8,000, the more likely it was to correct. And while the cryptocurrency did, in fact, plunge 6.7 percent, some traders like Josh Rager remain unfazed:

$BTC still in this condensing formation and held by horizontal supports. Not a lot has changed which shows that you don’t have to stare at charts all day – waiting for that next massive candle.

Bitcoin price analysis meanwhile shows that BTC/USD is currently being supported by an ascending triangle pattern, a bullish sign.

Where do you think will Bitcoin go from here? Don't hesitate to let us know in the comments below!


Images courtesy of TradingView, CFTC, Shutterstock.

The post Bitcoin Futures: Institutions Went 100% Long as Price Soared to $8K appeared first on Bitcoinist.com.

anyone else like this post as much as i do

Saving money is all well and good in theory.

It’s pretty hard to argue having more cash in your pocket could ever be a bad thing.

But what are you saving for? After all, money is just a tool. If you don’t have solid financial goals, all those hoarded pennies might end up floating in limbo when they could be put to good use.

Figuring out where your money should go might seem daunting, but it’s actually a lot of fun.

You get to analyze your own priorities and decide exactly what you think you should do with your hard-earned cash.

Talk about adulting, right?

But to make the most of your money, follow a few best practices while setting your goals.

After all, even if something seems like exactly what you want right now, it might not be in future-you’s best interest. And you’re playing the long game… that’s why they’re called goals!

What to Do Before You Start Writing Your Financial Goals

To keep yourself from deciding your financial goals are “buy the coolest toys and cars, get deeply into debt and watch my credit score plummet” — all super easy to do — we’ve compiled this guide.

It’ll help you set goals and create smart priorities for your money.

That way, however you decide to spend your truly discretionary income, you won’t leave the 10-years-from-now version of you in the lurch.

First Things First: How Much Money Do You Have?

You can’t decide on your short- or long-term financial goals if you don’t know how much money you have or where it’s going.

And if you’re operating without a budget, it can be easy to run out of money well before you run out of expenses — even if you know exactly how much is in your paycheck.

So sit down and take a good, hard look at all of your financial info.

A ton of great digital apps can help you do this — here are our favorite budgeting apps — but it can be as simple as a spreadsheet or even a good, old-fashioned piece of paper. It just takes two steps:

  1. Figure out how much money you have. It might be in checking or savings accounts, including long-term accounts like IRAs. Or, it might be wrapped up in investments or physical assets, like your paid-off car.
  2. Assess any debts you have. Do you keep a revolving credit card balance? Do you pay a mortgage each month? Are your student loans still hanging around?

Take the full amount of money you owe and subtract it from the total amount you have, which you discovered in step one. The difference between the two is your net worth.

That’s the total amount of money you have to your name.

If it seems like a lot, cool. Hang tight and don’t let it burn a hole in your pocket. We’re not done yet.

If it seems like… not a lot, well, you’re about to fix that. Keep reading.

Create a Budget

Once you’ve learned your net worth, you need to start thinking about a working budget.

This will essentially be a document with your total monthly income at the top and a list of all the expenses you need to pay for every month.

And I do mean all of the expenses — that $4.99 recurring monthly payment for your student-discounted Spotify account definitely counts.

Your expenses probably include rent, electricity, cable or internet, a cell phone plan, various insurance policies, groceries, gas and transportation; and other looser categories like charitable giving, entertainment and travel.

Pro Tip

Print out the last two or three months of statements from your credit and debit cards and categorize every expense. You can often find ways to save by discovering patterns in your spending habits.

It’ll depend on your individual case — for instance, I totally have “wine” as a budget line item.

See? It’s all about priorities.

Start by listing how much you actually spent in each category last month. Subtract your total expenses from your total income. The difference should be equal to the amount of money left sitting in your bank account at month’s end.

It’s also the money you can use toward your long-term financial goals.

Want the number to be bigger? Go back through your budget and figure out where you can afford to make cuts. Maybe you can ditch the cable bill and decide between Netflix or Hulu, or replace one takeout lunch with a packed version.

You don’t need to abandon the idea of having a life (and enjoying it), but there are ways to make budgetary adjustments that work for you.

Set the numbers you’re willing to spend in each category, and stick to them.

Congratulations. You’re in control of your money.

Now you can figure out exactly what you want to do with it.

How to Set Your Financial Goals

Before you run off to the cool-expensive-stuff store, hold on a second.

Your financial goals should be (mostly) in this order:

  1. Build an emergency fund.
  2. Pay down debt.
  3. Plan for retirement.
  4. Set short-term and long-term financial goals.

We say “mostly” because it’s ultimately up to you to decide in which order you want to accomplish them.

Many experts suggest making sure you have an emergency fund in place before aggressively going after your debt.

But if you’re hemorrhaging money on sky-high interest charges, you might not have much expendable cash to put toward savings.

That means you’ll pay the interest for a lot longer — and pay a lot more of it — if you wait to pay it down until you have a solid emergency fund saved up.

1. Build an Emergency Fund

Finding money to sock away each month can be tough, but just starting with $10 or $25 of each paycheck can help.

You can make the process a lot easier by automating your savings. Or you can have money from each paycheck automatically sent to a separate account you won’t touch.

You also get to decide the size of your emergency fund, but a good rule of thumb is to accumulate three to six times the total of your monthly living expenses. Good thing your budget’s already set up so you know exactly what that number is, right?

You might try to get away with a smaller emergency fund — even $1,000 is a better cushion than nothing. But if you lose your job, you still need to be able to eat and make rent.

2. Pay Down Debt

Now, let’s move on to repaying debt. Why’s it so important, anyway?

Because you’re hemorrhaging money on interest charges you could be applying toward your goals instead.

So even though becoming debt-free seems like a big expense and sacrifice right now, you’re doing yourself a huge financial favor in the long run.

There’s lots of great information out there about how to pay off debt, but it’s really a pretty simple operation: You need to put every single penny you can spare toward your debts until they disappear.

One method is known as the debt avalanche method, which involves paying off debt with the highest interest rates first, thereby reducing the overall amount you’ll shell out for interest.

For example, if you have a $1,500 revolving balance on a credit card with a 20% APR, it gets priority over your $14,000, 5%-interest car loan — even though the second number is so much bigger.

Pro Tip

If you’re motivated by quick wins, the debt snowball method may be a good fit for you. It involves paying off one loan balance at a time, starting with the smallest balance first.

Make a list of your debts and (ideally) don’t spend any of your spare money on anything but paying them off until the number after every account reads “$0.” Trust me, the day when you become debt-free will be well worth the effort.

As a bonus, if your credit score could be better, repaying revolving debt will also help you repair it — just in case some of your goals (like buying a home) depend upon your credit report not sucking.

3. Plan for Retirement

All right, you’re all set in case of an emergency and you’re living debt-free.

Congratulations! We’re almost done with the hard part, I promise.

But there’s one more very important long-term financial goal you most definitely want to keep in mind: retirement.

Did you know almost half of Americans have absolutely nothing saved so they can one day clock out for the very last time?

And the trouble isn’t brand-new: We’ve been bad enough at saving for retirement over the past few decades that 20% of today’s seniors can’t afford to retire.

If you ever want to stop working, you need to save up the money you’ll use for your living expenses.

And you need to start now, while compound interest is still on your side. The younger you are, the more time you have to watch those pennies grow, but don’t fret if you got a late start — here’s how to save for retirement in your 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s.

If your job offers a 401(k) plan, take advantage of it — especially if your employer will match your contributions! Trust me, the sting of losing a percentage of your paycheck will hurt way less than having to work into your golden years.

Ideally, you’ll want to find other ways to save for retirement, too. Look into individual retirement arrangements (IRAs) and figure out how much you need to contribute to meet your retirement goals.

Future you will thank you. Heartily. From a hammock.

4. Set Short-Term and Long-Term Financial Goals (the Fun Part!)

Is everything in order? Amazing!

You’re in awesome financial shape — and you’ve made it to the fun part of this post.

Consider the funds you have left — and those you’ll continue to earn — after taking care of all the financial goals above. Now think: What do you want to do with your money?

What experiences or things can your money buy to significantly increase your quality of life and happiness?

You might plan to travel more, take time off work to spend with family or drive the hottest new Porsche.

Maybe you want to have a six-course meal at the finest restaurant in the world or work your way through an extensive list of exotic and expensive wines. (OK, I’ll stop projecting.)

No matter your goals, it’s helpful to categorize them by how long they’ll take to save for.

Make a list of the goals you want to achieve with your money and which category they fall into. Then you can figure out how to prioritize your savings for each objective.

For example, some of my goals have included:

By writing down my short- and long-term financial goals and approximately how long I expect it will take to achieve each, I can figure out what to research and how aggressively I need to plan for each goal.

It also offers me the opportunity to see what I prioritize — and to revise those priorities if I see fit.

I’m happy to see my goals revolve around gaining new experiences and increasing my financial freedom, rather than buying fancy-but-expendable new stuff.

You get to figure out what makes you happy to spend your money on… which is figuring out what kind of person you want to be.

Told you this was gonna be fun.

Jamie Cattanach (@jamiecattanach) has written for VinePair, SELF, Ms. Magazine, Roads & Kingdoms, The Write Life, Barclaycard’s Travel Blog, Santander Bank’s Prosper and Thrive and other outlets. Her writing focuses on food, wine, travel and frugality.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Saving money is all well and good in theory.

It’s pretty hard to argue having more cash in your pocket could ever be a bad thing.

But what are you saving for? After all, money is just a tool. If you don’t have solid financial goals, all those hoarded pennies might end up floating in limbo when they could be put to good use.

Figuring out where your money should go might seem daunting, but it’s actually a lot of fun.

You get to analyze your own priorities and decide exactly what you think you should do with your hard-earned cash.

Talk about adulting, right?

But to make the most of your money, follow a few best practices while setting your goals.

After all, even if something seems like exactly what you want right now, it might not be in future-you’s best interest. And you’re playing the long game… that’s why they’re called goals!

What to Do Before You Start Writing Your Financial Goals

To keep yourself from deciding your financial goals are “buy the coolest toys and cars, get deeply into debt and watch my credit score plummet” — all super easy to do — we’ve compiled this guide.

It’ll help you set goals and create smart priorities for your money.

That way, however you decide to spend your truly discretionary income, you won’t leave the 10-years-from-now version of you in the lurch.

First Things First: How Much Money Do You Have?

You can’t decide on your short- or long-term financial goals if you don’t know how much money you have or where it’s going.

And if you’re operating without a budget, it can be easy to run out of money well before you run out of expenses — even if you know exactly how much is in your paycheck.

So sit down and take a good, hard look at all of your financial info.

A ton of great digital apps can help you do this — here are our favorite budgeting apps — but it can be as simple as a spreadsheet or even a good, old-fashioned piece of paper. It just takes two steps:

  1. Figure out how much money you have. It might be in checking or savings accounts, including long-term accounts like IRAs. Or, it might be wrapped up in investments or physical assets, like your paid-off car.
  2. Assess any debts you have. Do you keep a revolving credit card balance? Do you pay a mortgage each month? Are your student loans still hanging around?

Take the full amount of money you owe and subtract it from the total amount you have, which you discovered in step one. The difference between the two is your net worth.

That’s the total amount of money you have to your name.

If it seems like a lot, cool. Hang tight and don’t let it burn a hole in your pocket. We’re not done yet.

If it seems like… not a lot, well, you’re about to fix that. Keep reading.

Create a Budget

Once you’ve learned your net worth, you need to start thinking about a working budget.

This will essentially be a document with your total monthly income at the top and a list of all the expenses you need to pay for every month.

And I do mean all of the expenses — that $4.99 recurring monthly payment for your student-discounted Spotify account definitely counts.

Your expenses probably include rent, electricity, cable or internet, a cell phone plan, various insurance policies, groceries, gas and transportation; and other looser categories like charitable giving, entertainment and travel.

Pro Tip

Print out the last two or three months of statements from your credit and debit cards and categorize every expense. You can often find ways to save by discovering patterns in your spending habits.

It’ll depend on your individual case — for instance, I totally have “wine” as a budget line item.

See? It’s all about priorities.

Start by listing how much you actually spent in each category last month. Subtract your total expenses from your total income. The difference should be equal to the amount of money left sitting in your bank account at month’s end.

It’s also the money you can use toward your long-term financial goals.

Want the number to be bigger? Go back through your budget and figure out where you can afford to make cuts. Maybe you can ditch the cable bill and decide between Netflix or Hulu, or replace one takeout lunch with a packed version.

You don’t need to abandon the idea of having a life (and enjoying it), but there are ways to make budgetary adjustments that work for you.

Set the numbers you’re willing to spend in each category, and stick to them.

Congratulations. You’re in control of your money.

Now you can figure out exactly what you want to do with it.

How to Set Your Financial Goals

Before you run off to the cool-expensive-stuff store, hold on a second.

Your financial goals should be (mostly) in this order:

  1. Build an emergency fund.
  2. Pay down debt.
  3. Plan for retirement.
  4. Set short-term and long-term financial goals.

We say “mostly” because it’s ultimately up to you to decide in which order you want to accomplish them.

Many experts suggest making sure you have an emergency fund in place before aggressively going after your debt.

But if you’re hemorrhaging money on sky-high interest charges, you might not have much expendable cash to put toward savings.

That means you’ll pay the interest for a lot longer — and pay a lot more of it — if you wait to pay it down until you have a solid emergency fund saved up.

1. Build an Emergency Fund

Finding money to sock away each month can be tough, but just starting with $10 or $25 of each paycheck can help.

You can make the process a lot easier by automating your savings. Or you can have money from each paycheck automatically sent to a separate account you won’t touch.

You also get to decide the size of your emergency fund, but a good rule of thumb is to accumulate three to six times the total of your monthly living expenses. Good thing your budget’s already set up so you know exactly what that number is, right?

You might try to get away with a smaller emergency fund — even $1,000 is a better cushion than nothing. But if you lose your job, you still need to be able to eat and make rent.

2. Pay Down Debt

Now, let’s move on to repaying debt. Why’s it so important, anyway?

Because you’re hemorrhaging money on interest charges you could be applying toward your goals instead.

So even though becoming debt-free seems like a big expense and sacrifice right now, you’re doing yourself a huge financial favor in the long run.

There’s lots of great information out there about how to pay off debt, but it’s really a pretty simple operation: You need to put every single penny you can spare toward your debts until they disappear.

One method is known as the debt avalanche method, which involves paying off debt with the highest interest rates first, thereby reducing the overall amount you’ll shell out for interest.

For example, if you have a $1,500 revolving balance on a credit card with a 20% APR, it gets priority over your $14,000, 5%-interest car loan — even though the second number is so much bigger.

Pro Tip

If you’re motivated by quick wins, the debt snowball method may be a good fit for you. It involves paying off one loan balance at a time, starting with the smallest balance first.

Make a list of your debts and (ideally) don’t spend any of your spare money on anything but paying them off until the number after every account reads “$0.” Trust me, the day when you become debt-free will be well worth the effort.

As a bonus, if your credit score could be better, repaying revolving debt will also help you repair it — just in case some of your goals (like buying a home) depend upon your credit report not sucking.

3. Plan for Retirement

All right, you’re all set in case of an emergency and you’re living debt-free.

Congratulations! We’re almost done with the hard part, I promise.

But there’s one more very important long-term financial goal you most definitely want to keep in mind: retirement.

Did you know almost half of Americans have absolutely nothing saved so they can one day clock out for the very last time?

And the trouble isn’t brand-new: We’ve been bad enough at saving for retirement over the past few decades that 20% of today’s seniors can’t afford to retire.

If you ever want to stop working, you need to save up the money you’ll use for your living expenses.

And you need to start now, while compound interest is still on your side. The younger you are, the more time you have to watch those pennies grow, but don’t fret if you got a late start — here’s how to save for retirement in your 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s.

If your job offers a 401(k) plan, take advantage of it — especially if your employer will match your contributions! Trust me, the sting of losing a percentage of your paycheck will hurt way less than having to work into your golden years.

Ideally, you’ll want to find other ways to save for retirement, too. Look into individual retirement arrangements (IRAs) and figure out how much you need to contribute to meet your retirement goals.

Future you will thank you. Heartily. From a hammock.

4. Set Short-Term and Long-Term Financial Goals (the Fun Part!)

Is everything in order? Amazing!

You’re in awesome financial shape — and you’ve made it to the fun part of this post.

Consider the funds you have left — and those you’ll continue to earn — after taking care of all the financial goals above. Now think: What do you want to do with your money?

What experiences or things can your money buy to significantly increase your quality of life and happiness?

You might plan to travel more, take time off work to spend with family or drive the hottest new Porsche.

Maybe you want to have a six-course meal at the finest restaurant in the world or work your way through an extensive list of exotic and expensive wines. (OK, I’ll stop projecting.)

No matter your goals, it’s helpful to categorize them by how long they’ll take to save for.

Make a list of the goals you want to achieve with your money and which category they fall into. Then you can figure out how to prioritize your savings for each objective.

For example, some of my goals have included:

By writing down my short- and long-term financial goals and approximately how long I expect it will take to achieve each, I can figure out what to research and how aggressively I need to plan for each goal.

It also offers me the opportunity to see what I prioritize — and to revise those priorities if I see fit.

I’m happy to see my goals revolve around gaining new experiences and increasing my financial freedom, rather than buying fancy-but-expendable new stuff.

You get to figure out what makes you happy to spend your money on… which is figuring out what kind of person you want to be.

Told you this was gonna be fun.

Jamie Cattanach (@jamiecattanach) has written for VinePair, SELF, Ms. Magazine, Roads & Kingdoms, The Write Life, Barclaycard’s Travel Blog, Santander Bank’s Prosper and Thrive and other outlets. Her writing focuses on food, wine, travel and frugality.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

I think anything about are fab

Problems with Making Money Online without Investment in India

Earlier I have discussed how one can earn money online in India without any sort of investment. There is a clear-cut guide to building a profitable internet home business. But one has to face a lot of problems is he/she is determined to not to invest a single rupee in buying stuff required to work at home online. Like in any business buying & selling is involved, internet marketing is no exception. It takes money to earn money online.

First problems come with the appearance. Your blogger blog could be worth visiting as it is having contents of worth but I have seen many surfers avoiding to read blogspot blogs irrespective of the attractive design. It’s a question of trust and branding. Keeping aside the branding thing you can at least get a custom domain for your blogger blog to look professional. It will cost you $10 a year. Not much. Right?

https://i.redd.it/xdjds7hrhc321.jpg

You will get a lot of free hosting services around the web. They have limitations and problems. Blogspot hosts your free blog but you may find your blog deleted by Blogger claiming you are spamming the web. Frustrating indeed. It’s better to blog on self-hosted WordPress as long as the security is concerned.

To become a successful online marketer you need a combination of products like SEO tools, Keyword research tools, Content Rewriter, WordPress Plugins, Informational products, directory submitter, PLR articles and lot others. You might have to take membership to attend different webinars or forums in order to keep yourself updated and learn more useful tactics of earning money online. You may have to invest in freelancers to get your outsourced work done.

Those who are still clicking ads, reading emails should stop by now. Because this is in no way a viable way to earn money online in India. Don’t just get tempted as because it is free to join. Do not forget that your time is money. You should not afford to waste your time. Try to do something meaningful.

And one of the pathetic problems is that fraudsters take chances of selling products containing information about how one can earn money online for free which is available for free on the internet.

My motive was to change the mindset of those looking for free online opportunities to get rich soon. No shortcut. You have to become a part of this buying-selling process directly or indirectly in order to make money online from home. Have a businessman like an attitude and try different projects. You would surely get the return on your investment.

submitted by /u/gunjanprajapati
[link] [comments]

Problems with Making Money Online without Investment in India

Earlier I have discussed how one can earn money online in India without any sort of investment. There is a clear-cut guide to building a profitable internet home business. But one has to face a lot of problems is he/she is determined to not to invest a single rupee in buying stuff required to work at home online. Like in any business buying & selling is involved, internet marketing is no exception. It takes money to earn money online.

First problems come with the appearance. Your blogger blog could be worth visiting as it is having contents of worth but I have seen many surfers avoiding to read blogspot blogs irrespective of the attractive design. It’s a question of trust and branding. Keeping aside the branding thing you can at least get a custom domain for your blogger blog to look professional. It will cost you $10 a year. Not much. Right?

https://i.redd.it/xdjds7hrhc321.jpg

You will get a lot of free hosting services around the web. They have limitations and problems. Blogspot hosts your free blog but you may find your blog deleted by Blogger claiming you are spamming the web. Frustrating indeed. It’s better to blog on self-hosted WordPress as long as the security is concerned.

To become a successful online marketer you need a combination of products like SEO tools, Keyword research tools, Content Rewriter, WordPress Plugins, Informational products, directory submitter, PLR articles and lot others. You might have to take membership to attend different webinars or forums in order to keep yourself updated and learn more useful tactics of earning money online. You may have to invest in freelancers to get your outsourced work done.

Those who are still clicking ads, reading emails should stop by now. Because this is in no way a viable way to earn money online in India. Don’t just get tempted as because it is free to join. Do not forget that your time is money. You should not afford to waste your time. Try to do something meaningful.

And one of the pathetic problems is that fraudsters take chances of selling products containing information about how one can earn money online for free which is available for free on the internet.

My motive was to change the mindset of those looking for free online opportunities to get rich soon. No shortcut. You have to become a part of this buying-selling process directly or indirectly in order to make money online from home. Have a businessman like an attitude and try different projects. You would surely get the return on your investment.

submitted by /u/gunjanprajapati
[link] [comments]

biggest super fan

By CCN: British politics is turning into a Game of Thrones massacre as vicious power battles are set to force Prime Minister Theresa May off her Iron Throne. May is widely expected to resign on Friday as her Brexit strategy descends into shambolic chaos. May was seen leaving her Downing Street office last night in tears after a day of fatal blows to her position as leader. As support for her latest Brexit deal crumbles, a senior cabinet minister stabbed her in the back by resigning in anger.  More than two years after UK voters elected to leave the European

The post Theresa May to Quit as Brexit Disaster Turns into Game of Thrones Clusterf**k appeared first on CCN

By CCN: British politics is turning into a Game of Thrones massacre as vicious power battles are set to force Prime Minister Theresa May off her Iron Throne. May is widely expected to resign on Friday as her Brexit strategy descends into shambolic chaos. May was seen leaving her Downing Street office last night in tears after a day of fatal blows to her position as leader. As support for her latest Brexit deal crumbles, a senior cabinet minister stabbed her in the back by resigning in anger.  More than two years after UK voters elected to leave the European

The post Theresa May to Quit as Brexit Disaster Turns into Game of Thrones Clusterf**k appeared first on CCN

Anything about this is so important

Japan’s FSA will reportedly review the anti-money laundering policies of various crypto exchanges ahead of an inspection by international regulators.

Japan’s Financial Services Agency (FSA) is reportedly cracking down on crypto exchanges that offer anonymous transactions or have weak identity verification practices in preparation for inspection by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) this fall. Nikkei Asian Review reported the development on May 22.

The FATF will reportedly send its investigatory arm to review the strength of the Japanese FSA’s anti-money laundering (AML) policies, which includes policy for crypto exchanges and other financial services.

Japan reportedly was given the worst possible score for identity verification in financial institutions in a 2008 report by the FATF. A decade later, the Japanese FSA issued business improvement orders to practices that did not take appropriate AML measures, such as allowing users to sign up for their accounts with a PO box in lieu of a personal home address.

According to the report, Japan was the first country to implement a registration system for cryptocurrency exchanges.

In October, the FATF amended its rules to include crypto exchanges in its AML regulatory framework, and implored G-7 member countries to start implementing strategies for registration, licensing, and monitoring crypto exchanges.

Japan is hosting the Summit on Financial Markets and the World Economy (G20 2019) in Osaka this June, and will be expected to talk address the forum on international crypto regulations and initial coin offerings (ICOs). Unlike China and South Korea, Japan has not declared a national ban on ICOs.

As previously reported on Cointelegraph, Japanese FSA revealed in January that there are currently seven pending applications for crypto exchange licenses in the country. The applications are reviewed over a six month period, as the financial organization scrutinizes the applicant’s responses to over 400 questions.

In July of last year, the FSA underwent major restructuring in order to better meet the challenges of regulating the fintech and cryptocurrency sectors.

Japan’s FSA will reportedly review the anti-money laundering policies of various crypto exchanges ahead of an inspection by international regulators.

Japan’s Financial Services Agency (FSA) is reportedly cracking down on crypto exchanges that offer anonymous transactions or have weak identity verification practices in preparation for inspection by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) this fall. Nikkei Asian Review reported the development on May 22.

The FATF will reportedly send its investigatory arm to review the strength of the Japanese FSA’s anti-money laundering (AML) policies, which includes policy for crypto exchanges and other financial services.

Japan reportedly was given the worst possible score for identity verification in financial institutions in a 2008 report by the FATF. A decade later, the Japanese FSA issued business improvement orders to practices that did not take appropriate AML measures, such as allowing users to sign up for their accounts with a PO box in lieu of a personal home address.

According to the report, Japan was the first country to implement a registration system for cryptocurrency exchanges.

In October, the FATF amended its rules to include crypto exchanges in its AML regulatory framework, and implored G-7 member countries to start implementing strategies for registration, licensing, and monitoring crypto exchanges.

Japan is hosting the Summit on Financial Markets and the World Economy (G20 2019) in Osaka this June, and will be expected to talk address the forum on international crypto regulations and initial coin offerings (ICOs). Unlike China and South Korea, Japan has not declared a national ban on ICOs.

As previously reported on Cointelegraph, Japanese FSA revealed in January that there are currently seven pending applications for crypto exchange licenses in the country. The applications are reviewed over a six month period, as the financial organization scrutinizes the applicant’s responses to over 400 questions.

In July of last year, the FSA underwent major restructuring in order to better meet the challenges of regulating the fintech and cryptocurrency sectors.